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National Association of Manufacturers
Organized in Ohio in 1895 with the goal to protect American goods from foreign competition and to promote trade expansion, the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) continues today as the largest manufacturing association in the United States. This digital collection contains a selection of images primarily dating to the 1960s and 1970s.
    The collection has not been digitized in its entirety. For a detailed description of the entire audiovisual collection, click here to view the finding aid.
    Read more about the collection on the NAM Project News site.
National Automobile Dealers Association
The National Automobile Dealer's Association (NADA) was founded in 1917 to represent the interests of auto dealers in the United States. NADA currently represents 16,000 new car and truck dealers encompassing 32,500 franchises. The material in this archive includes NADA publications covering 1934 to 2014. In addition the archive includes NADA convention materials, press releases, and video content. For a detailed description of the entire collection, click here to view the finding aid.
    Access to this collection was made possible through the generous support of the National Automobile Dealers Association www.nada.org
National Urban League publications, 1930-1960
The Committee on Urban Conditions Among Negroes in New York was established in 1910 to assist black migrants arriving from the rural South in adjusting to life in the urban North. Following a series of mergers, the organization's name was changed and shortened to the National Urban League in 1920.
    The interracial coalition of civil rights advocates that made up the League adopted a mission to help African-Americans "to secure economic self-reliance, parity, power and civil rights." This mission was manifested through the provision of community-based social services, advocacy on the behalf of black workers, and other efforts to address the problems black Americans faced in securing equal access to employment, recreation, education, housing, medical care, and government services.
    This digital collection contains publications in the Hagley Library's catalog that were issued by the national and regional branches of the Urban League. In addition to the publications below, the Library also carries Opportunity: A Journal of Negro Life, an academic and literary journal published by the National Urban League from 1923 to 1949. To view the catalog record for this publication, click here.
    Image: National Urban League 40th Anniversary Logo, 40th Anniversary Year Book, 1951, inside covers. To view this item in the digital collection, click here.
Nation's Business Magazine
The publication of the United States Chamber of Commerce. All issues from 1914 to 1999 have been digitized.
New York Tunnel Extension of the Pennsylvania Railroad album
Series of photographs taken by De W. C. Ward, a New York City photographer, and compiled into the photobook "New York Tunnel Extension of the Pennsylvania Railroad," ca. 1910. They document the recently completed tunnel extension with images of the exterior and interior of Pennsylvania Station in New York City as well as freight yards, railroad tunnels, rail stations, and railroad service buildings in the surrounding area. This album is part of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company photograph collection, which has not been digitized in its entirety. For more information about this collection, click here to view a detailed description.
    Image: Pennsylvania Station: Main Concourse - General View, c. 1910. Click to view.
Niagara Falls Power Company power generation facility photograph album
    The story of harnessing the great waterpower of Niagara Falls dates from 1890 when a 'power tunnel' was dug to bring the water to a central power station from which it was distributed as electrical energy. Westinghouse built three AC dynamos for Power Station No. 1 located 1.5 miles above Niagara Falls. In 1895, the Niagara Falls Hydraulic Power and Manufacturing Company started building Power Station No. 2.
    The obvious success of utilizing Niagara's waterpower began when electricity was first delivered to Buffalo an impressive twenty-two miles away on November 16, 1898. These two power stations were closed after more than sixty years of service in 1961.
    Many of the photographs in this collection document the erection of wooden poles for power transmission lines between Niagara Falls and Buffalo. There are also photographs showing the power houses and transformer building, which was designed by Stanford White of McKim, Mead & White; these include exteriors as well as interiors. The latter includes 3 phase rotary AC generators made by General Electric and air blast transformers. There are some photos of the Niagara River Rapids, and two views of the interurban trolley line that was powered by the Niagara Falls Power Company.
    Image: Railroad Bridge, ca. 1895-1897. Click here to view this page in full.
Nora C. Edwards papers
Nora C. Edwards established the Edwards Skirt Supporter Company around 1903 in Spooner, Wisconsin to market and sell her patented invention. The purpose of the skirt supporter was to fasten a dress skirt and a shirt waist together, preventing the shirt waist from slipping up the back and the dress skirt from dropping below the waistline. From 1903 to early 1905, Edwards traveled throughout the Southern and Midwestern United States, making contacts and hiring women agents to sell the skirt supporters. By September 1905, Nora Edwards permanently relocated to Buffalo, New York, where she maintained the company's headquarters.
    The collection comprises personal and business correspondence received by Nora Edwards between 1887 and 1917 from family members, agents, friends, and patent attorneys. The letters often combine personal and business matters. Letters from friends and family members mention Edwards’ business as well as family matters and give descriptive accounts of life in rural Wisconsin, Minnesota, North Dakota, and Indiana. Letters from agents for the Edwards Skirt Supporter Company contain orders for additional supporters and descriptions of working habits and efforts to interest customers. For a detailed description of the collection, click here to view the finding aid.
    Image: Printed flyer for the Edwards Skirt Supporter Company, on top of which a sales agent has written to Nora Edwards. Click to view.
Oral History
This collection includes a compilation of oral histories that have been digitized and are available online. This is not a comprehensive collection of all oral history content at Hagley. For more information, please contact us at research@hagley.org.
Penn Virginia Corporation photograph collection
Incorporated in 1882 as the Virginia Coal & Iron Company, the Penn Virginia Corporation began as a large south Appalachian coal and land company. The collection has not been digitized in its entirety. The online collection is a curated selection of items consisting largely of glass plate negatives which depict the McCorkle Lumber Co. and its activities, a limestone quarry, a Civilian Conservation Corps camp, and the Interstate Railroad in Andover, Virginia. Click here for a detailed description of the Penn Virginia Corporation photograph collection.
    Image: Sawmill in Virginia. Click to view.
The Pennsylvania Railroad Company. A history prepared by Coverdale and Colpitts
In preparation for its 1946 centennial, the Pennsylvania Railroad Company commissioned the engineering firm of Coverdale & Colpitts to prepare a comprehensive history of the company. The commission involved the creation of two products. The first was this detailed four-volume history of the PRR System as it existed in 1946 for the use of management only. The data collected was subsequently utilized to produce the second product, Centennial History of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, which was mass distributed. The former work was printed in a limited edition of 100 copies which were strictly controlled and issued only to certain corporate officers, making it an essential but extremely rare source for PRR history.
    As its title indicates, this is not a narrative history, but rather a statistical compilation which accounts for the construction, financing and corporate succession of every segment of the PRR System to 1946. As very little mileage was added after that date, it practically covers the entire railroad. The volumes are arranged in the form of a chart of corporate succession, with the successor company followed by all of its predecessors in chronological order. Click here for a detailed description of the volumes.
    Click here for a linked index to all four volumes.
Pennsylvania Railroad negatives
Incorporated in 1846, the Pennsylvania Railroad Company became the largest railroad in the United States in terms of corporate assets and traffic from the last quarter of the nineteenth century through the mid-twentieth century. This collection of more than 5200 negatives from the official Pennsylvania Railroad files largely depict PRR trains, tracks, equipment, and facilities. The collection also contains numerous views of similar facilities and equipment on other railroads, of nearby buildings and properties, or of standardized equipment and accessories that were collected by the PRR for reference.
    The negatives were digitized to positives for online access. Most of the digital images seen here are black-and-white, low resolution copies produced from the original negatives.
    Image: Locomotive 3535 Click to view.
Philadelphia and Reading Coal and Iron Company photographs
The Philadelphia and Reading Coal and Iron Company was the largest producer of anthracite coal in the United States from 1871 through the 1920s. This collection primarily shows the company's operation in Locust Summit near Mount Carmel, Pennsylvania, and comprises 86 photographs that detail the steps of mining and processing anthracite coal. Click here for a detailed description of the Philadelphia and Reading Coal and Iron Company photographs collection. Image: Fuel from the Depths. Click to view.
Philadelphia Division of the Pennsylvania Railroad, Main Line bridge photographs
The Main Line of the Pennsylvania Railroad was a rail line connecting Philadelphia with Pittsburgh via Harrisburg. It is still an important cross-state corridor, composed of Amtrak's Philadelphia to Harrisburg Main Line, SEPTA's Paoli/Thorndale Line and the Norfolk Southern Railway's Pittsburgh Line. This collection comprises images of thirty-nine bridges on the Philadelphia Division of the Pennsylvania Railroad. The photographs were taken by or for the company as a form of property documentation. The original photographs were digitized and the scans donated to Hagley Museum and Library by Conrail employee Stephen J. Agostini. For a detailed description of the collection, click here to view the finding aid.
    Image: Penn Street bridge. Click to view.
Philadelphia railroad stations, Red Arrow Lines trolley track and bus photographs
    This collection documents some of the activities of the various public and private transportation agencies that were active in Philadelphia and its surrounding suburbs in the years between 1927 and 1965.
    These include the Pennsylvania Railroad (1846-1968), the Philadelphia Suburban Transportation Company (1936-1970), the Passenger Service Improvement Corporation (1960-1965), the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Compact (1961-1965), and the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority, or SEPTA (1963- ).
    The majority of this small collections consists of photographic materials depicting transportation centers, buses and trains, and other mass transit infrastructure, including Philadelphia's Suburban Station, 30th Street Station, and the Penn Center complex. Other photographs document promotional activities conducted by transit agencies. There is also an undated rental brochure for the Fidelity-Philadelphia Trust Building and promotional material from the Laclede Steel Company.
    Image: Aluminum bus shelter, ca. 1965. Click here to see the item in the digital collection.
Phoenix Bridge Company photograph collection
Incorporated in 1884, the Phoenix Bridge Company specialized in railroad bridges, both long-span truss bridges and movable bridges of the swing, bascule and vertical lift type. In the early 20th century, Phoenix built a number of very large bridges, the most notorious of which was the Quebec Bridge over the St. Lawrence (1900-1907). This collection, largely comprising twentieth-century photo prints of bridges and construction projects, has not been digitized in its entirety. Click here for a detailed description of the entire Phoenix Bridge Company photograph collection.
    Image: Quebec Bridge during construction. Click to view.
Photographs of wedding cakes and caterers
Edith N. McConnell was a confectioner and caterer in Wilmington, Delaware from the 1920s through the 1950s. The collection consists of 13 photographs, mostly dating from circa 1945, of wedding cakes, table settings, and the interior of Edith McConnell's confectionery business. Some photographs show members of bridal parties, waiters, and restaurant staff, and a few of the individuals pictured are identified. For a detailed description of the collection, click here to view the finding aid.
    Image: Unidentified woman with E.N. McConnell Resturant store display window. Click to view.
Pierre A. Gentieu Brandywine River Valley photographs
This collection is comprised of 326 images taken by E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company employee Pierre Gentieu from approximately 1880 to 1920. Gentieu's images document the DuPont Company Powder Yards along the banks of the Brandywine River in Wilmington Delaware. The collection documents the surrounding community along the Brandywine including worker's families, du Pont family homes, churches in the area, DuPont Company exposition displays, and other facets of social and work life in the area. For a detailed description of the Gentieu collection of Brandywine River Valley images, click here to view the finding aid.
    Image: Employees at E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company powder yards. Click to view.
Plymouth Cordage Company album
    The Plymouth Cordage Company of North Plymouth, Massachusetts, was founded in 1824 by Bourne Spooner (1790-1870), an ardent abolitionist whose commitment to free labor ideology led the company to implement generous employee benefits and facilities for its workers.
    By the late 19th century, the company had become a major international manufacturer of rope and twine. Its products were in heavy use within shipping and fishing industries, though its binder twine was also in widespread use on farms.
    After serving as the largest employer in Plymouth for over 100 years, the company went out of business in 1964. Its assets were purchased by the Columbian Rope Company in 1965.
    This album documents the company's operations in the years around 1900. It contains sixteen photographs of plant interiors showing machinery and manufacturing processes, and two exterior views of the building.
    Image: Plymouth Cordage Company factory interior, ca. 1900. Click here to view this image in the digital collection.
Postcard views of John B. Stetson plant
This collection consists of thirteen unused postcards with halftone photographic illustrations showing views of the Philadelphia plant of the hat manufacturer, John B. Stetson Company. Images depict plant facilities as well as employees at work and participating in recreational activities. The postcards date to approximately 1913. Click here for a detailed description of the collection, postcard views of John B. Stetson plant.
    Image: Flanging Stetson soft hats. Click to view.
Postcards of motels, roadside attractions, restaurants, etc. in the United States
This collection comprises 130 postcards dating from approximately 1930 to 1960. The postcards depict motels (including motor courts and cabins), restaurants, roadside attractions, and scenic views from across the United States. Click here for a detailed description of the collection.
    Image: Dutch Haven Family Style Restaurants. Click to view.
PQ Corporation photographic collection
Joseph Elkinton began the Elkinton Company in 1831 as a Philadelphia candle and soap shop. After successfully marketing synthetic silicate-based soap during the Civil War, the company acquired a new plant in Anderson, Indiana, and began manufacturing lye, fertilizers, oils, greases, adhesives, fiber, and wall board. In 1888, the company name changed to the Philadelphia Quartz Company, and, in 1978, the name changed again to PQ Corporation when company headquarters moved to Valley Forge, Pennsylvania. This collection has not been digitized in its entirety. The online collection largely consists of images of unidentified employees dating from approximately 1860 to 1940. Click here for a detailed description of the PQ Corporation photographic collection.
    Image: Employees at Kansas City, Missouri works. Click to view.
Project Brandywine : Aerial Images of the Brandywine River Valley
This collection features nearly 500 aerial photographs of the Brandywine valley taken in 1970 in a project conceived and sponsored by Ellice and Rosa McDonald. These images feature aerial views of Brandywine River valley locations in southeastern Pennsylvania and Delaware including factories, cities and towns, historical sites, natural landmarks, bridges, neighborhoods, and other places of importance. A project dedication states that the photographs are "for all of the people who have lived or worked on the Brandywine and for those who have loved it." Image: Brandywine Creek Valley at Smith Bridge in New Castle County, Delaware. Click to view.
P.S. du Pont Longwood photographs
This collection of over 6400 photographs includes images collected by Pierre S. du Pont during his life. Over 1000 images from the collection show the development of Longwood Gardens. Also included are photographs of the du Pont family, travel images, and a variety of other photos documenting the interests and activities of P.S. du Pont. Click here for a detailed description of the Longwood Collection
    Image: P.S. du Pont at Longwood, circa 1931. Click to view.
PSFS Building
Construction on the PSFS building in Philadelphia began in 1931 under architects George Howe and William Lescaze with the design slogan, "Nothing More Modern." The online PSFS Building collection includes images of the building's design, construction, and interiors, along with articles and promotional materials about the building. This collection is a small selection from the PSFS Collection that is open for research at the Hagley Library. For detailed description of the entire PSFS photograph collection, click here to view the catalog record..
    Image: Rooftop sign plan for PSFS building. Click to view.
Pusey and Jones Corporation photographs
This digital collection includes more than 2,100 of the approximately 6,700 images in the Pusey & Jones Photograph Collection. Pusey and Jones specialized in ship and machine building. Pusey and Jones Company's main facility was located in Wilmington, Delaware on the Christina River. The collection has not been digitized in its entirety. For a detailed description of the entire collection, click here to view the catalog record.
    Image: Cape Diamond built for U.S. Maritime Commission, 1943. Click to view.

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