Interview with John A. Dougherty, 1956 October 19 [audio](part 2)

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  • Riding carts on the narrow gauge railroad; Locating buildings in the powder yards; The color of the machine shops, homes, and other buildings
    Partial Transcript: "If that damn thing hadn't jumped the track that night we'd still be going..."
    Synopsis: [The interview begins mid sentence.] Dougherty talks about riding a cart full of gunpowder downhill on the narrow gauge railroad tracks in the powder yards. He describes switchbacks in a portion of the track that was on a hill. The interviewers describe the switchbacks as a "zig-zag" pattern. Dougherty says that the track ran to the Rockland railroad branch and that the track was used for sodium nitrate deliveries. Dougherty describes the location of buildings in the powder yards. He talks about local homes and the families that lived in them. He offers his thoughts on explosions, and says that no one thought they would be caught in the next explosion. He says that the machine shop, many homes, doors, and other buildings were a "lead" color which he says was a blue-grey shade. [The interview ends abruptly.]
    Keywords: Buildings; Crawfish Run; Hagley Yard; Lead color; Machine shop; Narrow gauge railroad; Paint; Powder Magazines; Rockland, Del.; Soda house; Sodium nitrate; Switchbacks; Upper Yard
  • Inaudible
    Partial Transcript:
    Synopsis: There is no conversation in this section.
    Keywords:
  • Other people Dougherty knows; DuPont hiring women; Breakup of the powder trust; Using a typewriter
    Partial Transcript: "Last time I saw Bill must have been six or seven years ago..."
    Synopsis: [The interview begins mid-sentence.] Dougherty talks about writing his will. He discusses other people from the Hagley area that he knows and the first women to work for DuPont. Dougherty talks about what he recalls of the breakup of the Powder Trust. Dougherty says that DuPont started typing letters after moving into the DuPont Building in Wilmington, Del. He identifies places where he thinks some old handwritten letter books might be found.
    Keywords: Atlas Powder Company; Carbon paper; Du Pont, T. Coleman (Thomas Coleman), 1863-1930; DuPont; Gunpowder Trust Association; Hercules Powder Company; Hiring; Laflin & Rand Powder Company; Smith, Edna; Typewriters; Typing; Wilmington, Del.; Women