Search Results

  • CSV Spreadsheet
(26 - 50 of 113)

Pages

# Title Date(s) Contributor(s) Description Collection ID Hagley ID Collection
1 Interview with Wesley Memeger, Jr., 2014 August 19 2014-08-19 Memeger, Wesley, Jr. (interviewee), Smith, John K. (John Kenly), 1951- (interviewer), Oates, Mike (videographer), 302 Stories, Inc. (production company), Eleutherian Mills-Hagley Foundation (originator) Wesley Memeger, Jr. details his contribution to streamlining the synthesis of Kevlar, which allowed the timely start-up of the first commercial scale Kevlar plant. In the laboratory, the polymer for Kevlar had previously been prepared by polymerizing para-phenylene diamine and terephthaloyl chloride in a mixture of two solvents, HMPA (hexamethylphosphoramide) and NMP (N-methylpyrrolidinone). Memeger found that a polymer with satisfactory molecular weight could be made using only HMPA, a...
Show more
Wesley Memeger, Jr. details his contribution to streamlining the synthesis of Kevlar, which allowed the timely start-up of the first commercial scale Kevlar plant. In the laboratory, the polymer for Kevlar had previously been prepared by polymerizing para-phenylene diamine and terephthaloyl chloride in a mixture of two solvents, HMPA (hexamethylphosphoramide) and NMP (N-methylpyrrolidinone). Memeger found that a polymer with satisfactory molecular weight could be made using only HMPA, a discovery which made the preparation of Kevlar more commercially viable, as it allowed for a continuous polymerizer in a single solvent system.

Memeger recounts that DuPont used HMPA as the solvent for Kevlar production in the early 1970s, but after toxicology tests conducted at the company's Haskell Laboratory raised doubts about the safety of the solvent, DuPont replaced HMPA with NMP and calcium chloride. Memeger describes his subsequent work at DuPont investigating melt processible polymers, which share some properties with Kevlar but lack equivalent chemical and thermal stability, as well as his work on ring opening routes to polymers with novel properties. An accomplished artist, Memeger continues to be impressed by the elegance and simplicity of the Kevlar polymer that produces such remarkable properties.
Show less
History of Kevlar oral history interviews (Accession 2014.249) 2014249_20140819_Memeger History of Kevlar oral history interviews
2 Interview with Ted Merriman, 2015 December 4 2015-12-04 Merriman, Ted (interviewee), Smith, John K. (John Kenly), 1951- (interviewer), Oates, Mike (videographer), 302 Stories, Inc. (production company), Eleutherian Mills-Hagley Foundation (originator) After describing his education and early work at the DuPont Savannah River plant, Merriman describes his first project at the Pioneering Laboratory at DuPont Experimental Station in Wilmington in 1969 working on new uses for ceramic aluminum oxide fiber PRD-29. Merriman then details his role in developing a pulped form of Kevlar fiber that made it suitable for use in automobile brake lining in the late 1970s, after it was discovered that the standard material, asbestos fiber, caused a...
Show more
After describing his education and early work at the DuPont Savannah River plant, Merriman describes his first project at the Pioneering Laboratory at DuPont Experimental Station in Wilmington in 1969 working on new uses for ceramic aluminum oxide fiber PRD-29. Merriman then details his role in developing a pulped form of Kevlar fiber that made it suitable for use in automobile brake lining in the late 1970s, after it was discovered that the standard material, asbestos fiber, caused a particular form of lung cancer. Merriman developed a process that produced Kevlar fluff using conventional paper-making equipment. Because Kevlar cost about one hundred times as much as asbestos, brake linings had to be redesigned to use very small amounts of it. Working with brake pad manufacturers, Merriman succeeded in producing a commercially viable Kevlar brake pads that had good wear characteristics and were quieter than other types. Brake lining became a significant market for Kevlar. Merriman also describes the extensive testing on Kevlar that DuPont performed at its toxicology facility, the Haskell Laboratory, to ensure that Kevlar did not have adverse health effects.
Show less
History of Kevlar oral history interviews (Accession 2014.249) 2014249_20151204_Merriman History of Kevlar oral history interviews
3 Interview with Herbert Blades, 2014 August 19 2014-08-19 Blades, Herbert (interviewee), Smith, John K. (John Kenly), 1951- (interviewer), Oates, Mike (videographer), 302 Stories, Inc. (production company), Eleutherian Mills-Hagley Foundation (originator) After describing his education and early work at the DuPont Company on polymer solutions, Herbert Blades recounts his contributions to the development of Tyvek and Kevlar. On the Tyvek project, he describes developing the polymerization process for creating high-density polyethylene fibers after such paper-like fibers had been accidentally created in the laboratory.

Blades details his work on Kevlar, for which he developed a commercially viable process to spin fibers from the polymer. Blades...
Show more
After describing his education and early work at the DuPont Company on polymer solutions, Herbert Blades recounts his contributions to the development of Tyvek and Kevlar. On the Tyvek project, he describes developing the polymerization process for creating high-density polyethylene fibers after such paper-like fibers had been accidentally created in the laboratory.

Blades details his work on Kevlar, for which he developed a commercially viable process to spin fibers from the polymer. Blades describes the three components of the process. First, he discovered that a relatively high concentration of polymer could be dissolved upon heating in 100 per cent sulfuric acid, which is non-aqueous and non-corrosive. The resulting solution had a low enough viscosity that it could be spun rapidly through a spinnerette, a small hole. Next, Blades discovered that instead of spinning the fiber directly into a water bath, leaving a small air gap led to fibers that were significantly stronger. Finally, he determined that the water "quenching" of the fiber occurred extremely fast. His spinning innovations made it possible to spin Kevlar fibers economically and at high speeds.
Show less
History of Kevlar oral history interviews (Accession 2014.249) 2014249_20140819_Blades History of Kevlar oral history interviews
4 Interview with Carl Milligan, 2021 February 19 2021-02-19 Milligan, Carl, 1934?- (interviewee), Plasky, Joseph G. (interviewer) Interviewer Joe Plasky asks the interviewee to describe their early life, education, and career history. In his interview, Carl Milligan details the following development projects with which he was involved: methods for determination of ratio of lubricant to antistatic on Dacron staple; equilibrium-no ditch process for staple fibers; beaming process for applying tints to industrial tire yarns; analytical methods for industrial evaluation of epoxy adhesive-activated tire yarns; unreactive...
Show more
Interviewer Joe Plasky asks the interviewee to describe their early life, education, and career history. In his interview, Carl Milligan details the following development projects with which he was involved: methods for determination of ratio of lubricant to antistatic on Dacron staple; equilibrium-no ditch process for staple fibers; beaming process for applying tints to industrial tire yarns; analytical methods for industrial evaluation of epoxy adhesive-activated tire yarns; unreactive epoxies for use in industrial spinning; Kevlar staple process; and improved staple finish in conjunction with Goulston, Inc.
Show less
Oral history interviews with former employees of DuPont Company's Textile Fibers Department (Accession 2010.215) 2010215_20210219_Milligan Oral history interviews with former employees of DuPont Company's Textile Fibers Department
5 Interview with John Paul Ryan, 2020 May 7 2020-05-07 Ryan, John Paul, 1953- (interviewee), Plasky, Joseph G. (interviewer) Interviewer Joe Plasky asks the interviewee to describe their early life, education, and career history. During his interview, John Paul Ryan also goes into detail about the industrial chemistry research being done while he was at Savannah River. He also discusses his work upgrading the laboratory operations at Chambers Works and the impact his efforts had on the business.
Oral history interviews with former employees of DuPont Company's Textile Fibers Department (Accession 2010.215) 2010215_20200507_Ryan Oral history interviews with former employees of DuPont Company's Textile Fibers Department
6 Interview with Joe Kurian, 2020 January 22 2020-01-22 Kurian, Joseph V. (interviewee), Plasky, Joseph G. (interviewer) Interviewer Joe Plasky asks the interviewee to describe their early life, education, and career history.
Oral history interviews with former employees of DuPont Company's Textile Fibers Department (Accession 2010.215) 2010215_20200122_Kurian Oral history interviews with former employees of DuPont Company's Textile Fibers Department
7 Apparatus assembly, Jackson Lab, Deepwater Point, New Jersey 1945 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_4442 DuPont Product Information photographs
8 Research chemist conducting explosives research 1945 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator), Stewart, Willard S., 1915-2003 (photographer) At the DuPont Company's Experimental Station, Wilmington Delaware, this Explosives Department research chemist uses high vacuum, glass equipment in a study that may lead to a new chemical compound or a new and better way of making a known compound. The work is part of the department's fundamental research program aimed at the discovery of new products outside the explosives field.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_0663 DuPont Product Information photographs
9 DuPont lab team discussing results of an experiment 1955 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) The industrial chemist today stands in sharp contrast with the lone wolf inventor common even a little more than a generation ago. Although the initiative and creative thought of the individual is still of prime importance, the modern researcher is a team player with a strong sense of cooperative effort. Pictured here is a DuPont lab team discussing results of an experiment.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_4449 DuPont Product Information photographs
10 Drying treated samples of textiles 1955 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) Textile chemicals to make cotton and rayon resist creasing and mildew are aims of research by DuPont chemist shown here drying treated samples in this laboratory at the Experimental Station. Textile chemical research stems from early work on dyes.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_2647 DuPont Product Information photographs
11 DuPont research physicists arranging mirrors for infrared microspectroscopy study 1955 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) Mirrors are being arranged by DuPont research physicists preparatory to making preliminary studies in infrared microspectroscopy. The measure of light absorbed by a tiny sample will help determine the molecular structure of the material being analyzed. This experiment is being carried out in a central research lab at the DuPont Company's Experimental Station.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_4441 DuPont Product Information photographs
12 Purifying gases in laboratory at E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company Experimental Station 1955 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) At the Experimental Station, DuPont carries out fundamental research as a vital part of its scientific activities. This type of research is conducted to uncover new knowledge without regard to specific commercial objectives. Here in a fundamental research study a chemist uses a complex vacuum train of glass apparatus to purify gases for subsequent study in the gaseous phase.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_4432 DuPont Product Information photographs
13 High vacuum apparatus in the laboratories of the DuPont Chemical Department 1955 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) This complicated piece of high vacuum apparatus in the laboratories of the Chemical Department of DuPont is used for measuring the surface are of fine powders, such as pigments. The process involves measuring the amount of gas such as nitrogen absorbed on
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_4423 DuPont Product Information photographs
14 DuPont chemist at work in the laboratory with petrographic microscope 1955 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) The petrographic microscope at his right is used to identify organic compounds. Insets show (1) the crystal of an organic compound (2) the interference figure or optic picture created by passing polarized light through the crystal in the petrographic microscope. Measurement of this figure helps to identify the compound.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_4428 DuPont Product Information photographs
15 Special glass apparatus to determine sulfur in liquid samples 1955 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) Assemblies of glassware of special and complex design are frequently necessary for the analysis of chemical compounds in the development of new and improved products. Here a chemist and laboratory assistant at the Experimental Station set up special glass apparatus to determine sulfur in liquid samples.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_4414 DuPont Product Information photographs
16 Chemical pipe organ glassware setup 1955 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) This 'chemical pipe organ' is one of the laboratory tools used in biological chemical research studies at DuPont's Stine Lab near Newark, Delaware. Its one hundred intricately connected test tubes help separate complex mixtures into individual components.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_4413 DuPont Product Information photographs
17 Observing a catalytic reaction 1955 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) The catalytic reaction being observed by this DuPont scientist is part of the Electrochemicals Department's long range research program. One dramatic result of this type of research was a new process for making vinyl acetate, a polymer intermediate important in the manufacture of polyvinyl acetate resin emulsion adhesives and paints.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_2700 DuPont Product Information photographs
18 Production of cellophane 1955 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) Progress continues after product is on the market. Moisture proof cellophane was developed three years after DuPont had plain film. Today there are more than 50 types and 5,000 uses for sheets like that inspected in Buffalo research laboratory by Hal Charch, inventor, and chemist Russell Clark and Jim Mitchell.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_1654 DuPont Product Information photographs
19 Researching Mylar 1955 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) Although Mylar polyester film was introduced by DuPont more than 12 years ago, research on this product continues. Here in the Film Department's Research and Development Laboratory at the Circleville, Ohio plant, a research chemist makes a modified sheet of Mylar film on a laboratory stretcher. It will be evaluated by marketing specialists for possible commercial introduction. In recent years, the film has been modified by DuPont to create 50 types and thicknesses to meet a range of...
Show more
Although Mylar polyester film was introduced by DuPont more than 12 years ago, research on this product continues. Here in the Film Department's Research and Development Laboratory at the Circleville, Ohio plant, a research chemist makes a modified sheet of Mylar film on a laboratory stretcher. It will be evaluated by marketing specialists for possible commercial introduction. In recent years, the film has been modified by DuPont to create 50 types and thicknesses to meet a range of industrial applications.
Show less
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_1789 DuPont Product Information photographs
20 DuPont chemist observes progress of a distillation operation at the Experimental Station 1955 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) A chemist observes progress of a distillation operation at the Experimental Station. When cooled with liquid air, many gases are converted to liquids which are then distilled in this low temperature still, like water or other ordinary liquids.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_4459 DuPont Product Information photographs
21 Electron microscope 1955 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) The electron microscope is one of the research chemist's most valuable aids to discovery. This one at the DuPont Company's Experimental Station is capable of 100,000 diameter magnification. The image is projected, for direct visual examination, on fluorescent screen or, for photographing, on a plate of film.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_4457 DuPont Product Information photographs
22 Film testing at the Experimental Station 1955 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) At the DuPont Company's Experimental Station near Wilmington, Delaware a Film Department chemist exposes a new experimental film to extreme conditions of temperature and ultraviolet radiation. The study is part of the company's fundamental research program. Such drastic accelerated tests help make it possible to predict product performance of packaging and industrial films under actual service conditions.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_1644 DuPont Product Information photographs
23 Two man laboratory at E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company Experimental Station 1955 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) The two man lab is the basic research facility in the new buildings of the DuPont Company's Experimental Station.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_4435 DuPont Product Information photographs
24 Reactor used in the development of a successful nylon salt process 1955 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_4455 DuPont Product Information photographs
25 Employees at the E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company Experimental Station 1955 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) This section of DuPont's Experimental Station on the Brandywine suggests the atmosphere of a college campus. Research, which has been conducted at the Station since 1903, has led to the development of many new and improved products, including nylon and neoprene. The experimental station houses nearly half of the company's total research personnel, representing the largest aggregation of DuPont research workers at one location.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_4490 DuPont Product Information photographs

Pages