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# Title Date(s) Contributor(s) Description Collection ID Hagley ID Collection
1 Interview with Joe Kurian, 2020 January 22 2020-01-22 Kurian, Joseph V. (interviewee), Plasky, Joseph G. (interviewer) Interviewer Joe Plasky asks the interviewee to describe their early life, education, and career history.
Oral history interviews with former employees of DuPont Company's Textile Fibers Department (Accession 2010.215) 2010215_20200122_Kurian Oral history interviews with former employees of DuPont Company's Textile Fibers Department
2 Apparatus assembly, Jackson Lab, Deepwater Point, New Jersey 1945 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_4442 DuPont Product Information photographs
3 Research chemist conducting explosives research 1945 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator), Stewart, Willard S., 1915-2003 (photographer) At the DuPont Company's Experimental Station, Wilmington Delaware, this Explosives Department research chemist uses high vacuum, glass equipment in a study that may lead to a new chemical compound or a new and better way of making a known compound. The work is part of the department's fundamental research program aimed at the discovery of new products outside the explosives field.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_0663 DuPont Product Information photographs
4 DuPont lab team discussing results of an experiment 1955 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) The industrial chemist today stands in sharp contrast with the lone wolf inventor common even a little more than a generation ago. Although the initiative and creative thought of the individual is still of prime importance, the modern researcher is a team player with a strong sense of cooperative effort. Pictured here is a DuPont lab team discussing results of an experiment.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_4449 DuPont Product Information photographs
5 Drying treated samples of textiles 1955 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) Textile chemicals to make cotton and rayon resist creasing and mildew are aims of research by DuPont chemist shown here drying treated samples in this laboratory at the Experimental Station. Textile chemical research stems from early work on dyes.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_2647 DuPont Product Information photographs
6 DuPont research physicists arranging mirrors for infrared microspectroscopy study 1955 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) Mirrors are being arranged by DuPont research physicists preparatory to making preliminary studies in infrared microspectroscopy. The measure of light absorbed by a tiny sample will help determine the molecular structure of the material being analyzed. This experiment is being carried out in a central research lab at the DuPont Company's Experimental Station.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_4441 DuPont Product Information photographs
7 Purifying gases in laboratory at E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company Experimental Station 1955 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) At the Experimental Station, DuPont carries out fundamental research as a vital part of its scientific activities. This type of research is conducted to uncover new knowledge without regard to specific commercial objectives. Here in a fundamental research study a chemist uses a complex vacuum train of glass apparatus to purify gases for subsequent study in the gaseous phase.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_4432 DuPont Product Information photographs
8 High vacuum apparatus in the laboratories of the DuPont Chemical Department 1955 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) This complicated piece of high vacuum apparatus in the laboratories of the Chemical Department of DuPont is used for measuring the surface are of fine powders, such as pigments. The process involves measuring the amount of gas such as nitrogen absorbed on
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_4423 DuPont Product Information photographs
9 DuPont chemist at work in the laboratory with petrographic microscope 1955 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) The petrographic microscope at his right is used to identify organic compounds. Insets show (1) the crystal of an organic compound (2) the interference figure or optic picture created by passing polarized light through the crystal in the petrographic microscope. Measurement of this figure helps to identify the compound.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_4428 DuPont Product Information photographs
10 Special glass apparatus to determine sulfur in liquid samples 1955 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) Assemblies of glassware of special and complex design are frequently necessary for the analysis of chemical compounds in the development of new and improved products. Here a chemist and laboratory assistant at the Experimental Station set up special glass apparatus to determine sulfur in liquid samples.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_4414 DuPont Product Information photographs
11 Chemical pipe organ glassware setup 1955 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) This 'chemical pipe organ' is one of the laboratory tools used in biological chemical research studies at DuPont's Stine Lab near Newark, Delaware. Its one hundred intricately connected test tubes help separate complex mixtures into individual components.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_4413 DuPont Product Information photographs
12 Observing a catalytic reaction 1955 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) The catalytic reaction being observed by this DuPont scientist is part of the Electrochemicals Department's long range research program. One dramatic result of this type of research was a new process for making vinyl acetate, a polymer intermediate important in the manufacture of polyvinyl acetate resin emulsion adhesives and paints.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_2700 DuPont Product Information photographs
13 Production of cellophane 1955 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) Progress continues after product is on the market. Moisture proof cellophane was developed three years after DuPont had plain film. Today there are more than 50 types and 5,000 uses for sheets like that inspected in Buffalo research laboratory by Hal Charch, inventor, and chemist Russell Clark and Jim Mitchell.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_1654 DuPont Product Information photographs
14 Researching Mylar 1955 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) Although Mylar polyester film was introduced by DuPont more than 12 years ago, research on this product continues. Here in the Film Department's Research and Development Laboratory at the Circleville, Ohio plant, a research chemist makes a modified sheet of Mylar film on a laboratory stretcher. It will be evaluated by marketing specialists for possible commercial introduction. In recent years, the film has been modified by DuPont to create 50 types and thicknesses to meet a range of...
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Although Mylar polyester film was introduced by DuPont more than 12 years ago, research on this product continues. Here in the Film Department's Research and Development Laboratory at the Circleville, Ohio plant, a research chemist makes a modified sheet of Mylar film on a laboratory stretcher. It will be evaluated by marketing specialists for possible commercial introduction. In recent years, the film has been modified by DuPont to create 50 types and thicknesses to meet a range of industrial applications.
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DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_1789 DuPont Product Information photographs
15 DuPont chemist observes progress of a distillation operation at the Experimental Station 1955 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) A chemist observes progress of a distillation operation at the Experimental Station. When cooled with liquid air, many gases are converted to liquids which are then distilled in this low temperature still, like water or other ordinary liquids.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_4459 DuPont Product Information photographs
16 Electron microscope 1955 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) The electron microscope is one of the research chemist's most valuable aids to discovery. This one at the DuPont Company's Experimental Station is capable of 100,000 diameter magnification. The image is projected, for direct visual examination, on fluorescent screen or, for photographing, on a plate of film.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_4457 DuPont Product Information photographs
17 Film testing at the Experimental Station 1955 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) At the DuPont Company's Experimental Station near Wilmington, Delaware a Film Department chemist exposes a new experimental film to extreme conditions of temperature and ultraviolet radiation. The study is part of the company's fundamental research program. Such drastic accelerated tests help make it possible to predict product performance of packaging and industrial films under actual service conditions.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_1644 DuPont Product Information photographs
18 Two man laboratory at E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company Experimental Station 1955 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) The two man lab is the basic research facility in the new buildings of the DuPont Company's Experimental Station.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_4435 DuPont Product Information photographs
19 Reactor used in the development of a successful nylon salt process 1955 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_4455 DuPont Product Information photographs
20 Employees at the E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company Experimental Station 1955 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) This section of DuPont's Experimental Station on the Brandywine suggests the atmosphere of a college campus. Research, which has been conducted at the Station since 1903, has led to the development of many new and improved products, including nylon and neoprene. The experimental station houses nearly half of the company's total research personnel, representing the largest aggregation of DuPont research workers at one location.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_4490 DuPont Product Information photographs
21 Studying chemical safety at the Haskell Lab for Toxicology and Industrial Medicine 1955 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) Growing importance of chemistry in modern life carries the challenge of safeguarding public health and safety against unforeseen hazards. New chemicals are subjected to elaborate and exhaustive tests before they are permitted to become commercial items. In DuPont Haskell Lab for Toxicology and Industrial Medicine, an experienced staff carried out the work started more than 20 years again. Here a biochemist makes blood cell study at the $2,000,000 lab near Newark, Delaware.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_3877 DuPont Product Information photographs
22 Organic chemistry research laboratory at E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company Experimental Station 1955 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) The research lab is the heart of the modern chemical industry. Large sums of money are annually spent for research. Many trained men are employed. The chemical operations demand the utmost care and are frequently quite complex. This image shows a typical set up in an organic research lab at the Experimental Station. The apparatus shown here is designed for carrying out distillations whereby various organic materials are separated and purified.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_4456 DuPont Product Information photographs
23 Taking electrochemical measurements to determine course of an organic reaction 1955 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) A DuPont chemist uses electrochemical measurements to determine the course of an organic chemical reaction. Studies like this are part of a continuing program of fundamental research aimed at finding better polymers which may be used to make packaging and industrial films with new and valuable properties. DuPont's interest in polymer chemistry dates from 1927 when its fundamental research program, the search for scientific knowledge without regard to specific commercial objectives was...
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A DuPont chemist uses electrochemical measurements to determine the course of an organic chemical reaction. Studies like this are part of a continuing program of fundamental research aimed at finding better polymers which may be used to make packaging and industrial films with new and valuable properties. DuPont's interest in polymer chemistry dates from 1927 when its fundamental research program, the search for scientific knowledge without regard to specific commercial objectives was launched. This picture was taken at Film Department research laboratory at the company's Experimental Station near Wilmington, Delaware.
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DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_1646 DuPont Product Information photographs
24 High vacuum apparatus 1955 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator), Rittase, William R. (photographer) This complicated piece of high vacuum apparatus in the laboratories of the Chemical Department of DuPont is used for measuring the surface are of fine powders, such as pigments. The process involves measuring the amount of gas such as nitrogen absorbed on the surface of a given weight of the powder. The greater the amount of gas absorbed, the greater is the 'specific surface area'. In the case of certain extremely fine powders, the total surface area of the particles in one teaspoonful may...
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This complicated piece of high vacuum apparatus in the laboratories of the Chemical Department of DuPont is used for measuring the surface are of fine powders, such as pigments. The process involves measuring the amount of gas such as nitrogen absorbed on the surface of a given weight of the powder. The greater the amount of gas absorbed, the greater is the 'specific surface area'. In the case of certain extremely fine powders, the total surface area of the particles in one teaspoonful may run as high as 1,000 square feet.
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DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_4417 DuPont Product Information photographs
25 Creation of Quilon 1955 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) Quilon chrome complex, a chemical that makes materials water repellent, was developed in DuPont's Industrial and Biochemicals Department. It greatly increase the wet strength of paper and is also widely used in treating felt hats, shoe leather and garment suede. Garments of sheepskin suede treated with Quilon may be dry cleaned by ordinary methods, without special processing. Here, a DuPont chemist makes an experimental batch for test coatings.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_2671 DuPont Product Information photographs

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