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# Title Date(s) Contributor(s) Description Description Collection ID Hagley ID Collection
1 Julian Hill recreating synthesis of first completely synthetic fiber 1941 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) Probably the most dramatic moment in DuPont research history is re-enacted above-the birth of the first completely synthetic fiber, impractical for commercial use but true forerunner of nylon itself. Here chemist Julian Hill shows how he pulled molten sample of material from a laboratory test tube at the company's Experimental Station near Wilmington, Delaware. The molasses-like mass stuck to the glass stirring rod and was drawn out into a thin fiber.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_1154 DuPont Product Information photographs
2 DuPont Lavoisier Awards 1992 1992 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (spn), Schroeder, H. E. (former owner) Program featuring Lavoisier Medal recipients Nathaniel Wyeth, Edward Howard and Daniel Gintis, W. Hale Charch and Elmer Bolton. Interviews with Jack Belou, Norton Higgins, Stephanie Kwolek, Fred Sweeney and Marjorie Orr. Announces 1992 Lavoisier Awards recipients: Carl John Heffelfinger, Howard Wayne Jacobson, Hein Louis Klopping and Herman Elbert Schroeder.
Herman Schroeder collection of DuPont Company audiovisual materials (Accession 2010.204) VID_2010204_B03_ID01 Film and Video
3 Perfume research at the New Brunswick, New Jersey laboratory 1944-04 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator), Duryea, Drix (photographer) Theodore Hoffman, director of the DuPont perfume laboratories and an outstanding authority on perfumes, applies the last test to a bottle of perfume-which depends on the olfactory sense and not on formulas, at the New Brunswick, New Jersey factory of E.I. du Pont Nemours & Company. For perfume making is both an art and a science. The materials are supplied by he chemist-whether he extracts them from natural sources or creates synthetic components. But the blending calls for the perfumer who...
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Theodore Hoffman, director of the DuPont perfume laboratories and an outstanding authority on perfumes, applies the last test to a bottle of perfume-which depends on the olfactory sense and not on formulas, at the New Brunswick, New Jersey factory of E.I. du Pont Nemours & Company. For perfume making is both an art and a science. The materials are supplied by he chemist-whether he extracts them from natural sources or creates synthetic components. But the blending calls for the perfumer who works by inspiration. It takes a great artist to create a rare perfume, for not enough is known of the perfumers work to proceed by scientific formula. Until the lilac odor was synthesized-one of the outstanding achievements of the chemical laboratory in perfumery-there was no lilac perfume, for no satisfactory means has ever been found of extracting this natural oil. Moreover, there is no known natural extract so sweet or so peculiarly powerful in odor as synthetic lilac. Chemistry converts volatile turpentine into fragrant lilac rivaling natures illusive floral fragrance.
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DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_0652 DuPont Product Information photographs
4 Lavoisier Awards Opener 1999 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (spn) Begins with montage of video and text. Includes interview segments from Art Anderson, Jack Kreuz and Ted Koch. Introduction of new award recipients.
DuPont Company Textile Fabrics Department videotapes, photographs, slides and promotions (Accession 2011.320) VID_2011320_B09_ID03 DuPont Company Textile Fabrics Department videotapes
5 DuPont Lavoisier Award Ceremony 1992 1992 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (spn), Schroeder, H. E. (former owner) Begins with "Qualities That Endure," program featuring Lavoisier Medal recipients Nathaniel Wyeth, Edward Howard and Daniel Gintis, W. Hale Charch and Elmer Bolton. Interviews with Jack Belou, Norton Higgins, Stephanie Kwolek, Fred Sweeney and Marjorie Orr. Announces 1992 Lavoisier Awards recipients: Carl John Heffelfinger, Howard Wayne Jacobson, Hein Louis Klopping and Herman Elbert Schroeder. Award presentation follows with speaker Ed Willard, award presentation and comments from the...
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Begins with "Qualities That Endure," program featuring Lavoisier Medal recipients Nathaniel Wyeth, Edward Howard and Daniel Gintis, W. Hale Charch and Elmer Bolton. Interviews with Jack Belou, Norton Higgins, Stephanie Kwolek, Fred Sweeney and Marjorie Orr. Announces 1992 Lavoisier Awards recipients: Carl John Heffelfinger, Howard Wayne Jacobson, Hein Louis Klopping and Herman Elbert Schroeder. Award presentation follows with speaker Ed Willard, award presentation and comments from the recipients.
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Herman Schroeder collection of DuPont Company audiovisual materials (Accession 2010.204) VID_2010204_B03_ID02 Film and Video
6 Chemists study slide before a background of photomicrographs 1950/1959, 1950, 1959 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) DuPont chemists, engaged in fundamental research at the company's Experimental Station, study a slide before a background of photomicrographs.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_4474 DuPont Product Information photographs
7 Working in the Textile Research Laboratory 1920/1929, 1920, 1929 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) PC20110714_0519 DuPont Product Information photographs
8 Film testing at the Experimental Station 1950/1959, 1950, 1959 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) At the DuPont Company's Experimental Station near Wilmington, Delaware a Film Department chemist exposes a new experimental film to extreme conditions of temperature and ultraviolet radiation. The study is part of the company's fundamental research program. Such drastic accelerated tests help make it possible to predict product performance of packaging and industrial films under actual service conditions.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_1644 DuPont Product Information photographs
9 Perfume for rubber 1948-06 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) Aromatic chemist sniffs a sample. If suitable deodorant is added in right amount, odor of rubber will be masked.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_0656 DuPont Product Information photographs
10 Lab consultations at E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company laboratories 1950/1959, 1950, 1959 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) Through regular visits to DuPont Company labs some 60 university scientists, acting as consultants, give DuPont chemists the benefit of their broad experience. Shown here, left, is Professor Roger Adams of the University of Illinois.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_4475 DuPont Product Information photographs
11 The Nylon Rope Trick demonstrated by Dr. Paul W. Morgan 1940/1949, 1940, 1949 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) Dr. Paul W. Morgan of DuPont's Textile Fibers Pioneering Research Laboratory demonstrates the making of nylon, instantaneously, at room temperature, without any apparatus other than a drinking glass, a small jar or beaker. Practical commercial manufacture of nylon requires high temperatures, precision controls and complex and expensive equipment. Dr. Morgan shows here how a nylon rope can be drawn from a beaker when a solution of a fast reacting diacid chloride in a water immiscible solvent...
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Dr. Paul W. Morgan of DuPont's Textile Fibers Pioneering Research Laboratory demonstrates the making of nylon, instantaneously, at room temperature, without any apparatus other than a drinking glass, a small jar or beaker. Practical commercial manufacture of nylon requires high temperatures, precision controls and complex and expensive equipment. Dr. Morgan shows here how a nylon rope can be drawn from a beaker when a solution of a fast reacting diacid chloride in a water immiscible solvent is brought into contact with an aqueous solution of an aliphatic diamine. A film of high polymer forms where the two solutions meet which is called the interface. The film can then be pulled from the interface immediately and as if by magic, it is continuously replaced to form a long endless cord of polyamide-hence the nylon rope trick. This particular method of making nylon is an invaluable laboratory tool to researchers and teachers in chemistry because permits polymeric experimentation which are both inexpensive and uncomplicated.
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DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_1197 DuPont Product Information photographs
12 Nobel prize winner Professor Peter Debye addresses a group of DuPont scientists 1950/1959, 1950, 1959 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) Nobel prize winner Professor Peter Debye of Cornell University, a DuPont consultant, addresses a group of DuPont scientists at the company's Experimental Station. Professor Debye is one of a large number of outstanding university scientists who serve in a consulting capacity at the company's research divisions.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_4471 DuPont Product Information photographs
13 The Development of Industrial Research in America to 1920 1962 Lewis, W. David (Walter David), 1931- (author) Eleutherian Mills-Hagley Foundation research reports (Accession 1645) MS1645_047 Eleutherian Mills-Hagley Foundation research reports
14 1998 Lavoisier Award 1998 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (spn) Program includes Lavoisier Award opening for 1998 and interviews with recipients: Lothar Brixner, Jack Kirkland and David England.
DuPont Company Textile Fabrics Department videotapes, photographs, slides and promotions (Accession 2011.320) VID_2011320_B09_ID02 DuPont Company Textile Fabrics Department videotapes
15 Employees at the E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company Experimental Station 1950/1959, 1950, 1959 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) This section of DuPont's Experimental Station on the Brandywine suggests the atmosphere of a college campus. Research, which has been conducted at the Station since 1903, has led to the development of many new and improved products, including nylon and neoprene. The experimental station houses nearly half of the company's total research personnel, representing the largest aggregation of DuPont research workers at one location.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_4490 DuPont Product Information photographs
16 Testing Quilon water repellent 1950/1959, 1950, 1959 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) Quilon chrome complex, a chemical that makes materials water repellent, was developed in DuPont's Industrial and Bio chemicals Department. It greatly increases the wet strength of paper and is also widely used in treating felt hats, shoe leather and garment suede. Garments of sheepskin suede treated with Quilon may be dry cleaned by ordinary methods, without special processing. Here a DuPont Chemist makes an experimental batch for test coatings.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_2690 DuPont Product Information photographs
17 Interview with Helen Duncan [transcript] 1978 Strange, Adeline Bassett Cook, 1917-2004 (Interviewer), Duncan, Helen (Interviewee) Transcript of a conversation about Wallace Carothers between Helen Duncan and Cookie Strange. Duncan served as the Experimental Station Librarian, and she recalls Carothers's visits to the library, the chemists' interest in bird watching, and Helen Sweetman's affection for Carothers.
Carothers Oral History Project (Accession 1985) MSS_1985_01_01_08 Oral history interviews on Wallace Carothers
18 Determining the drying time of lacquer 1937-12 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) How fast a lacquer or finish will dry is determined by the use of plate glass discs coated with the material to be tested and revolved slowly while a thin trickle of sand falls on them from a cone shaped container. It has been found by DuPont chemists that the point at which the sand no longer adheres accurately determines the drying time.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_2782 DuPont Product Information photographs
19 Dr. Edward O. Hermann, research chemist, demonstrating Quilon 1950/1959, 1950, 1959 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_2673 DuPont Product Information photographs
20 Employees of the Haskell Laboratory of Industrial Toxicology 1950/1959, 1950, 1959 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_3906 DuPont Product Information photographs
21 Lifting experimental hood ornaments from a copper plating tank 1950/1959, 1950, 1959 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) Better plating on autos is one result of work done in the Electrochemicals Department Sales Technical Laboratory at Niagara Falls, New York. Here, a DuPont chemist lifts experimental hood ornaments from a copper plating tank. Copper is used as a base for the subsequent plating of nickel and then chrome.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_3387 DuPont Product Information photographs
22 Dr. Hale Charch In laboratory 1958 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) Development of the first successful moisture-proof cellophane film is reenacted here at DuPont's Experimental Station near Wilmington, Del. by the inventor, the late Dr. Hale Charch. The new film was developed after 2500 formulas had been tried and hundreds of tests made. Large bag on right held water for weeks, while control bags made3 of untreated film showed evaporation losses in a few days.
DuPont Company External Affairs Department photograph file (Accession 2004.268) AVD_2004268_P00001086 DuPont Company External Affairs Department photograph file
23 Testing laundered fabrics 1940/1949, 1940, 1949 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) In testing fabrics for the fastness of dyes in washing, special soaps and soda ash solutions are used. The fabrics are checked for 'bleeding' or running dyes. Fabrics are also laundered in accordance with commercial laundry standards and are given repeated tests on an accelerated basis to represent years of use.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_3010 DuPont Product Information photographs
24 Creation of Quilon 1950/1959, 1950, 1959 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) Quilon chrome complex, a chemical that makes materials water repellent, was developed in DuPont's Industrial and Biochemicals Department. It greatly increase the wet strength of paper and is also widely used in treating felt hats, shoe leather and garment suede. Garments of sheepskin suede treated with Quilon may be dry cleaned by ordinary methods, without special processing. Here, a DuPont chemist makes an experimental batch for test coatings.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_2671 DuPont Product Information photographs
25 Taking electrochemical measurements to determine course of an organic reaction 1950/1959, 1950, 1959 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) A DuPont chemist uses electrochemical measurements to determine the course of an organic chemical reaction. Studies like this are part of a continuing program of fundamental research aimed at finding better polymers which may be used to make packaging and industrial films with new and valuable properties. DuPont's interest in polymer chemistry dates from 1927 when its fundamental research program, the search for scientific knowledge without regard to specific commercial objectives was...
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A DuPont chemist uses electrochemical measurements to determine the course of an organic chemical reaction. Studies like this are part of a continuing program of fundamental research aimed at finding better polymers which may be used to make packaging and industrial films with new and valuable properties. DuPont's interest in polymer chemistry dates from 1927 when its fundamental research program, the search for scientific knowledge without regard to specific commercial objectives was launched. This picture was taken at Film Department research laboratory at the company's Experimental Station near Wilmington, Delaware.
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DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_1646 DuPont Product Information photographs

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