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# Title Date(s) Contributor(s) Description Description Collection ID Hagley ID Collection
1 Julian Hill recreating synthesis of first completely synthetic fiber 1941 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) Probably the most dramatic moment in DuPont research history is re-enacted above-the birth of the first completely synthetic fiber, impractical for commercial use but true forerunner of nylon itself. Here chemist Julian Hill shows how he pulled molten sample of material from a laboratory test tube at the company's Experimental Station near Wilmington, Delaware. The molasses-like mass stuck to the glass stirring rod and was drawn out into a thin fiber.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_1154 DuPont Product Information photographs
2 Perfume research at the New Brunswick, New Jersey laboratory 1944-04 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator), Duryea, Drix (photographer) Theodore Hoffman, director of the DuPont perfume laboratories and an outstanding authority on perfumes, applies the last test to a bottle of perfume-which depends on the olfactory sense and not on formulas, at the New Brunswick, New Jersey factory of E.I. du Pont Nemours & Company. For perfume making is both an art and a science. The materials are supplied by he chemist-whether he extracts them from natural sources or creates synthetic components. But the blending calls for the perfumer who...
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Theodore Hoffman, director of the DuPont perfume laboratories and an outstanding authority on perfumes, applies the last test to a bottle of perfume-which depends on the olfactory sense and not on formulas, at the New Brunswick, New Jersey factory of E.I. du Pont Nemours & Company. For perfume making is both an art and a science. The materials are supplied by he chemist-whether he extracts them from natural sources or creates synthetic components. But the blending calls for the perfumer who works by inspiration. It takes a great artist to create a rare perfume, for not enough is known of the perfumers work to proceed by scientific formula. Until the lilac odor was synthesized-one of the outstanding achievements of the chemical laboratory in perfumery-there was no lilac perfume, for no satisfactory means has ever been found of extracting this natural oil. Moreover, there is no known natural extract so sweet or so peculiarly powerful in odor as synthetic lilac. Chemistry converts volatile turpentine into fragrant lilac rivaling natures illusive floral fragrance.
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DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_0652 DuPont Product Information photographs
3 Working in the Textile Research Laboratory 1920/1929, 1920, 1929 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) PC20110714_0519 DuPont Product Information photographs
4 Perfume for rubber 1948-06 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) Aromatic chemist sniffs a sample. If suitable deodorant is added in right amount, odor of rubber will be masked.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_0656 DuPont Product Information photographs
5 Conducting research at the Experimental Station 1948 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_4466 DuPont Product Information photographs
6 Determining the drying time of lacquer 1937-12 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) How fast a lacquer or finish will dry is determined by the use of plate glass discs coated with the material to be tested and revolved slowly while a thin trickle of sand falls on them from a cone shaped container. It has been found by DuPont chemists that the point at which the sand no longer adheres accurately determines the drying time.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_2782 DuPont Product Information photographs
7 Burning liquid samples in Experimental Station laboratory 1946 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) Assemblies of flasks, bubbler absorption tubes and enclosed lamps make possible the burning of liquid samples and the collection of the gases formed. Here a chemist and laboratory assistants at the Experimental Station operate apparatus for determining sulfur in liquid samples.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_4415 DuPont Product Information photographs
8 Testing stencil paste 1930/1939, 1930, 1939 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) A result of the testing of stencil paste in the control laboratory of the DuPont Philadelphia Paint Plant.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_2785 DuPont Product Information photographs
9 Research laboratory at the Experimental Station 1935-11-04 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_4467 DuPont Product Information photographs
10 Ferdinand Hurter, Swiss industrial chemist 1880/1898, 1880, 1898 Litchfield, Carter (collector), Lewkowitsch, J. (Julius), 1857-1913 (former owner) March 15th 1844 - March 5th, 1898
Carter Litchfield photographs and ephemera on the history of fatty materials (Accession 2007.227) 2270352 Carter Litchfield history of fatty materials collections
11 Dr. Hale Charch, pioneer in cellophane 1924 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) The late Dr. Hale Charch, pioneer in the development of moisture-proof cellophane, working in DuPont laboratory in 1924.
DuPont Company External Affairs Department photograph file (Accession 2004.268) AVD_2004268_P00001077 DuPont Company External Affairs Department photograph file
12 Dr. Wallace H. Carothers 1928 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) Dr. Wallace Carothers, a promising young chemist, joined DuPont in 1928 as head of a fundamental research program in organic chemistry. Eleven years later a plant was producing the nylon that came from this research.
DuPont Company External Affairs Department photograph file (Accession 2004.268) AVD_2004268_P00000215 DuPont Company External Affairs Department photograph file
13 Dr. Hale Charch In laboratory 1927 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) DuPont Company External Affairs Department photograph file (Accession 2004.268) AVD_2004268_P00002241 DuPont Company External Affairs Department photograph file
14 Determining the degree of gloss 1938-02 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) To determine the degree of gloss in a lacquer or finish, du Pont chemists use a device that measures the amount of light reflected. The light from a constant source is thrown back from the panel into the telescope tube. One half of the 'eyepiece' is illuminated by this reflected radiation, with the other half lighted by a small bulb in the photometer tube attached to the side of the telescope. This light is passed back and forth in the tube until the brightness of the two section meet. The...
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To determine the degree of gloss in a lacquer or finish, du Pont chemists use a device that measures the amount of light reflected. The light from a constant source is thrown back from the panel into the telescope tube. One half of the 'eyepiece' is illuminated by this reflected radiation, with the other half lighted by a small bulb in the photometer tube attached to the side of the telescope. This light is passed back and forth in the tube until the brightness of the two section meet. The distance of the light from the 'eyepiece' is then a measure of the amount of light reflected or the gloss.
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DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_2784 DuPont Product Information photographs
15 A 'quartz fingernail' used to determine hardness of paint films 1930/1939, 1930, 1939 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) A 'quartz fingernail' is used by DuPont chemists to determine how hard a paint film is. The device measures the weight necessary to drive the rounded end of a quartz rod a given distance into the film. In this manner the exact hardness of the paint is ascertained,
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_2779 DuPont Product Information photographs
16 Perfume research at the New Brunswick, New Jersey laboratory 1942-04-22 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator), Duryea, Drix (photographer) About two dozen constituents, besides terpineol, combine to make synthetic lilac perfume. Mr. Theodore Hoffman, director of the DuPont perfume laboratories and an outstanding authority on perfumes, is shown at the scales of his laboratory compounding the ingredients of lilac perfume. Until the lilac odor was synthesized-one of the outstanding achievements of the chemical laboratory in perfumery-there was no lilac perfume, for no satisfactory means has ever been found of extracting this...
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About two dozen constituents, besides terpineol, combine to make synthetic lilac perfume. Mr. Theodore Hoffman, director of the DuPont perfume laboratories and an outstanding authority on perfumes, is shown at the scales of his laboratory compounding the ingredients of lilac perfume. Until the lilac odor was synthesized-one of the outstanding achievements of the chemical laboratory in perfumery-there was no lilac perfume, for no satisfactory means has ever been found of extracting this natural oil. Moreover, there is no known natural extract so sweet or so peculiarly powerful in odor as synthetic lilac. Chemistry converts volatile turpentine into fragrant lilac rivaling natures illusive floral fragrance.
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DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_0651 DuPont Product Information photographs
17 DuPont commercial on research chemists and fellowships 1950~, 1950 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (sponsor) Film explains the process of becoming a chemist, and the importance of fellowships given to universities by corporations. Nylon, chemical rubber, Penicillin are mentioned.
DuPont Company films and commercials (Accession 1995.300) FILM_1995300_FC251_05 DuPont Company films and commercials
18 This is the way we wash our hands 1944 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) To make a test of the new salt water soap developed for the Army say Louise Feldman left, and Frances Montgomery, chemists in the DuPont Technical Laboratory at Deepwater Point, New Jersey. Miss Montgomery, using the new soap khaki colored for camouflage, got the heavy fuel oil off her hand quicker and more easily that Miss Feldman who used ordinary soap. Secret of the new soap's success is a special synthetic detergent, know n only as MP-646, developed by DuPont chemists. Both the laboratory...
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To make a test of the new salt water soap developed for the Army say Louise Feldman left, and Frances Montgomery, chemists in the DuPont Technical Laboratory at Deepwater Point, New Jersey. Miss Montgomery, using the new soap khaki colored for camouflage, got the heavy fuel oil off her hand quicker and more easily that Miss Feldman who used ordinary soap. Secret of the new soap's success is a special synthetic detergent, know n only as MP-646, developed by DuPont chemists. Both the laboratory basins contain salt water, often the only kid available to soldiers for bathing and laundry in some theaters of war.
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DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_0638 DuPont Product Information photographs
19 Conducting synthetic textile research at the E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company Experimental Station 1941 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator), Rittase, William R. (photographer) DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_4420 DuPont Product Information photographs
20 Apparatus assembly, Jackson Lab, Deepwater Point, New Jersey 1945 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_4442 DuPont Product Information photographs
21 Judging dyed skeins 1945 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) Judging dyed skeins for strength and shade of the dye under north light in the Standardization Lab of the Technical Laboratory, Dyestuffs Division of the DuPont Company.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_3008 DuPont Product Information photographs
22 Research chemist conducting explosives research 1945 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator), Stewart, Willard S., 1915-2003 (photographer) At the DuPont Company's Experimental Station, Wilmington Delaware, this Explosives Department research chemist uses high vacuum, glass equipment in a study that may lead to a new chemical compound or a new and better way of making a known compound. The work is part of the department's fundamental research program aimed at the discovery of new products outside the explosives field.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_0663 DuPont Product Information photographs
23 The Nylon Rope Trick demonstrated by Dr. Paul W. Morgan 1945 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) Dr. Paul W. Morgan of DuPont's Textile Fibers Pioneering Research Laboratory demonstrates the making of nylon, instantaneously, at room temperature, without any apparatus other than a drinking glass, a small jar or beaker. Practical commercial manufacture of nylon requires high temperatures, precision controls and complex and expensive equipment. Dr. Morgan shows here how a nylon rope can be drawn from a beaker when a solution of a fast reacting diacid chloride in a water immiscible solvent...
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Dr. Paul W. Morgan of DuPont's Textile Fibers Pioneering Research Laboratory demonstrates the making of nylon, instantaneously, at room temperature, without any apparatus other than a drinking glass, a small jar or beaker. Practical commercial manufacture of nylon requires high temperatures, precision controls and complex and expensive equipment. Dr. Morgan shows here how a nylon rope can be drawn from a beaker when a solution of a fast reacting diacid chloride in a water immiscible solvent is brought into contact with an aqueous solution of an aliphatic diamine. A film of high polymer forms where the two solutions meet which is called the interface. The film can then be pulled from the interface immediately and as if by magic, it is continuously replaced to form a long endless cord of polyamide-hence the nylon rope trick. This particular method of making nylon is an invaluable laboratory tool to researchers and teachers in chemistry because permits polymeric experimentation which are both inexpensive and uncomplicated.
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DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_1197 DuPont Product Information photographs
24 Testing laundered fabrics 1945 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) In testing fabrics for the fastness of dyes in washing, special soaps and soda ash solutions are used. The fabrics are checked for 'bleeding' or running dyes. Fabrics are also laundered in accordance with commercial laundry standards and are given repeated tests on an accelerated basis to represent years of use.
DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_3010 DuPont Product Information photographs
25 Member of the staff of the Eastern Laboratory of the DuPont Company's Explosives Department 1945 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (originator) Shown at his laboratory bench is a member of the staff of the Eastern Laboratory of the DuPont Company's Explosives Department at Gibbstown, New Jersey. Established in 1902, this was the first of DuPont's research laboratories and is believed to represent the earliest organized research effort in the American Chemical industry. Its staff, which now numbers more than 200 men and women, has contributed many important developments in the field of industrial and military explosives. The...
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Shown at his laboratory bench is a member of the staff of the Eastern Laboratory of the DuPont Company's Explosives Department at Gibbstown, New Jersey. Established in 1902, this was the first of DuPont's research laboratories and is believed to represent the earliest organized research effort in the American Chemical industry. Its staff, which now numbers more than 200 men and women, has contributed many important developments in the field of industrial and military explosives. The laboratory has also served as a training ground for men who have helped staff some of the company's other research laboratories that today total more than 30.
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DuPont Company Product Information photographs (Accession 1972.341) 1972341_0665 DuPont Product Information photographs

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